The Evolution of Electronic Music


The Evolution of Electronic Music: A blog that covers the history and tends within electronic music.

The Evolution of Electronic Music: A blog that covers the history and tends within electronic music.

The Evolution of Electronic Music: A blog that covers the history and tends within electronic music.

The Evolution of Electronic Music: A blog that covers the history and tends within electronic music.

The Evolution of Electronic Music: A blog that covers the history and tends within electronic music.

The Evolution of Electronic Music: A blog that covers the history and tends within electronic music.

Posted on October 27, 2013 by jordanbennettblog

This blog is dedicated to presenting the evolution of electronic music and its many genres. The earliest forms of electronica began as sound effects in horror movies in the early 1900’s. Although some might argue the fact that the first use of electronic instruments occurred in 1874 with the invention of the telharmonium and then again in 1906 with Thaddeus Cahill’s dynaphone, these were merely an attempt to create an alternative to live instruments using electricity; they did not produce new sounds or effect existing sounds in a novel fashion.

The first electronic music was played through phonographs, radios, and gramophones which allowed for only a few people at a time to hear it. Throughout the years, as technology grew so did electronica. Musicians such as Pierre Schaeffer and Edgard Varèse are considered by many to be the fathers of modern electronic music. In 1948 Pierre Schaeffer invented a tape recorder which allowed him to create new sounds from existing ones such as recording a radio broadcast and manipulating it by slowing it down or speeding it up. He also recorded various sound

The Evolution of Electronic Music: An Interactive and Dynamic History

A blog that covers the history and tends within electronic music.

The Evolution of Electronic Music: An Interactive and Dynamic History is a blog maintained by Rick Walker, who is an avid collector of electronic music machines and devices.

Rick Walker started collecting electronic musical instruments in 1969 at the age of 17 with a Gibson Mini-Kee synthesizer. Over the years he has collected hundreds of vintage synthesizers, drum machines, samplers, sequencers, effects units, rhythm boxes, and other oddities.

The Evolution of Electronic Music: An Interactive and Dynamic History website features a timeline that provides information on the development of electronic music from its early beginnings to the present day. The timeline contains information on the development of various types of synthesizers, samplers, effects units, sequencers and more.

In addition to the timeline the blog also contains an extensive library of articles related to electronic music production, synthesis techniques and instrument reviews from various sources.

The Evolution of Electronic Music is a music blog that covers the history and trends within electronic music. In this blog you will find information on everything from the early days of electronic music to the latest artists, releases and festivals in the industry.

The Evolution of Electronic Music was started with one goal in mind: to give electronic music enthusiasts an outlet where they could come to find out about their favorite genre. By writing about both underground and mainstream artists we hope to bring attention to artists that deserve more recognition and to keep readers informed about some of their favorite performers.

Evolution is a blog/website devoted to the history and tendencies of contemporary electronic music. It was created in 1999 by David Battino, who has been writing about music and technology since the late 1980s. Evolution is a resource for anyone interested in the creative use of technology to make music.

Evolution began as a news and links site, but over time it has grown into something much bigger, with original articles on a variety of topics, an online forum for discussion of electronic musical instruments, interviews with cutting-edge artists and instrument designers, collections of classic and rare audio samples (made with vintage synthesizers from the 1960s and ’70s), and reviews of current gear.

Evolution’s author, David Battino, worked as an editor at Electronic Musician magazine from 1990 to 2007. He has written more than 400 articles on music technology for EM, Keyboard magazine (where he served as editor-in-chief from 1996 to 2001), Apple Computer’s Web site, Macworld magazine, Recording magazine, Sound On Sound (UK), Remix (UK) Mix Magazine and many other publications.

Computers have not only come to play a central role in the creation of electronic music, but also in the creation and dissemination of information about it. The Web has become a vast resource for all things related to the art and technique of sound design, recording and composition.

These resources are scattered across several hundred sites, many of them commercial or promotional in nature. This site is dedicated to gathering together information resources on electronic music. The focus will be primarily on historical matters and production techniques.

This project is just in its infancy, so new materials will be added almost daily over the next few months.

I have been interested in electronic music since I was 14 years old. At the time I was listening to classical music and wanted to hear what it sounded like on a synthesizer. My first instrument was a Casio keyboard with crappy sounds, but at the time it was perfect for me. The instrument had a built-in sequencer that could be recorded and played back with different tempos. I would record my melodies onto the sequencer, change the tempo and play around with the sound effects until something interesting came out.

Since then I have gone through several more instruments, including an Atari computer with a software synthesizer called Music Studio and a Yamaha QY700 sequencer workstation. The QY700 is still one of my favorite instruments because of its unique sound and huge selection of drum kits.

Currently I am using Cubase SX3 and Reason 3 as my main compositional tools, along with a Roland JV-1080 and 2080 synthesizers, a Roland Fantom X7 keyboard and an Alesis DM5 drum machine for playing live.


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