Learn how to compose calm and serene electronic music with this series of posts


Learn how to compose calm and serene electronic music with this series of posts: a series of blog postings about creating electronic instrumental music. Posts cover synthesizers, sequencers, midi controllers, sound effects, and more.

Learn how to compose calm and serene electronic music with this series of posts: a series of blog postings about creating electronic instrumental music.

The idea is to take you through the process of creating an album, step by step. The idea is that each post will be a complete thought, rather than just an update on what I’m doing.

The music will be created entirely in open source software on GNU/Linux systems. I’ll provide links to the software used at the beginning of each post, so you can follow along if you like.

There is a lot that goes into creating electronic music, and it is a relatively new type of music, so there are not many experts in the field. But one of the best resources available to those who want to learn how to create electronic instrumental music is this blog.

The author of this blog has been making electronic instrumental music for years, and he has come up with several different methods for creating calm and serene sounds that are extremely popular among listeners. One of his most effective techniques is to play multiple notes at the same time, but with different pitches. The result is a sound that is very soothing, but also very unique.

This series of posts will help you get started on your own journey into the world of electronic instrumental music creation. You can read about some basic techniques for creating your first pieces, as well as learn about some advanced techniques that will help you create even more complex sounds.

I am writing a series of blog postings about creating electronic instrumental music. This is the first post in the series. The later posts will be linked from here.

I’ve been writing a series of blog postings about creating electronic instrumental music. The first one is a brief overview of the field and some thoughts on types of electronic instrumental music. The second describes in detail the digital audio workstation I use to create my music (Reaper). The third discusses the various types of sound sources I use, both software and hardware.

Music is an important part of my life. Over the last few years, I have become interested in creating my own instrumental electronic music. This blog will be devoted to discussing my musical efforts and interests as well as sharing some of my musical creations.

I have been a big fan of instrumental electronic music for some time (since the mid-80’s). It has always seemed to me that it was a fertile area for innovation, and there are still a lot of things to discover. In recent years I have been composing music in my spare time, and I have found it an inspiring challenge.

I will be posting several articles about this topic, which I hope will be useful to people who are interested in learning about this subject. Here is an outline:

Part 1: What is instrumental electronic music?

Part 2: Choosing sound modules

Part 3: Designing a soundscape

Part 4: Creating melodies and rhythms

Part 5: Performance techniques and software

I will also post links to other resources on the web, including websites where you can download free music, and sites that offer advice on how to make your own music.

‘Make the music that you want to hear. If you’re not hearing it, no one else is.’-Richie Hawtin

It’s frustrating when you hear a track and think ‘I wish I could make something like that’ but then have no idea where to start with it. Well here’s your chance! We’ll be taking a look at some of the basics of Ableton Live over the next few posts, starting with how to set up a basic drum beat.

First things first, we need to start with a blank slate. Create an empty audio track by clicking in the bottom left hand corner and selecting audio. Once you’ve done this click on the name of your track and rename it Drums or something similar so you know what it is later on. Then create another audio track and rename this one Synth or however you’d like to reference it later on.

Once we’ve done that, we can start creating our drum beat. It’s always best to start with a 4/4 kick as that will give us a solid foundation to build upon later on. To create this, we’re going to use an instrument called Impulse which is included with Ableton Live 8/9 Suite. To find it, click on Instruments and select Imp


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