electro guerilla by Cabaret Voltaire


Electro Guerilla by Cabaret Voltaire on WhoSampled. Discover all of this album’s music connections, watch videos, listen to music, discuss and download.

This is a blog about industrial electronic music: an extremely wide genre that includes EBM (electronic body music), darkwave, coldwave, synthwave, industrial rock/metal, industrial hip hop and more. So when it comes to industrial electronic music, whatever you are into there will be something here for you. I have written about all these sub-genres plus other related topics such as the history of the genre and its influence on popular culture from movies through to fashion. I have written reviews of albums both old and new, have interviewed some of the main players in the scene and generally tried to explore the world of industrial electronic music in as much depth as possible.

Electro Guerilla by Cabaret Voltaire on WhoSampled. Discover all of this album’s music connections, watch videos, listen to music, discuss and download.

This is a blog about industrial electronic music: an extremely wide genre that includes EBM (electronic body music), darkwave, coldwave, synthwave, industrial rock/metal, industrial hip hop and more. So when it comes to industrial

Electro Guerilla is a blog about electronic music and the artists who created it.

It’s a record of time spent obsessively listening to and researching this music, books, magazine articles, interviews, discographies and ephemera.

I started Electro Guerilla in 2006 as a blog to accompany my own CD collection. I used it to find out more about the bands whose CDs I’d bought, filling in the gaps in my knowledge by writing about them for others to read.

Electro Guerilla has since grown into an archive of industrial music from the early 80s to the present day, covering the usual suspects like Cabaret Voltaire and Front 242 through to lesser known groups such as Liaisons Dangereuses and Artefakt. There are millions of words here now. (millions? Really?) There are hundreds of entries in alphabetical order so you can find any artist by name.

Some people have asked me how I found all these references on the internet. The answer is that I didn’t. They came from books, magazines and interviews – there wasn’t much online content before the late 90s…

Electro Guerilla – Cabaret Voltaire

January 12th, 2010 by shane

The first thing that comes to mind when thinking about Sheffield, England is probably steel or coal. But there’s another side of Sheffield that has been bubbling under the surface for decades and is home to one of the most influential electronic music acts to ever exist. It’s also home to a world famous club that has been going strong for over 30 years.

Sheffield is where Cabaret Voltaire got its start in 1973. Before “Cabaret Voltaire” became a political movement from World War I, it was a musical act from Sheffield, England formed by Stephen Mallinder (vocals), Richard H. Kirk (guitar) and Chris Watson (tapes). The band was named after the Dadaist group based in Zurich during WWI founded by Tristan Tzara, Hugo Ball and others.

This blog is dedicated to industrial electronic music, with a focus on early EBM and industrial rock. Here you will find reviews, discographies, interviews and other features about bands from the seventies and eighties that have been forgotten by most people.

The blog is run by Andreas Brandal and Lasse Marhaug – both musicians, composers and writers who share an interest for this specific type of music. We have also played together in a number of bands over the years, most notably as members of Könsförrädare.

We are proud to present this blog as an addition to our own music project Cabaret Voltaire (no connection with the band). Through our work we hope to shed some light on some overlooked gems from the past, but we also want to bring attention to contemporary bands that deserve more recognition.

Cabaret Voltaire was an industrial electronic music band formed in Sheffield, England in 1973. The group’s original members were Stephen Mallinder, Richard H. Kirk and Chris Watson. The group disbanded in 1994, but reformed briefly in the late 1990s and early 2000s to produce several new albums and tour.

Cabaret Voltaire’s earliest performances were Dada-influenced performance art. Their early work was characterized by use of tape loops, sounds derived from test equipment and DIY electronics (a forerunner of the electro-industrial genre). They also produced a number of experimental sound collages, featuring found sounds and samples from the extensive EMI Records library.

Early releases included the experimental tape collage Double Vision (1978) on RēR Records, and the LP Mix Up (1979), recorded live at Western Works studio in Sheffield during April 1978, featuring a wide range of experimental music including musique concrète techniques.

In 1980 Cabaret Voltaire signed to Rough Trade Records, releasing their first single as a trio, “Nag Nag Nag”. In 1981 Watson left the group to pursue a career as a television producer with Tyne Tees Television, leaving Kirk to take over programming duties. The band’s next

Cabaret Voltaire have a new live album out on iTunes. The release was timed to coincide with the band’s appearance at Moogfest in Asheville, North Carolina last month.

“The live show has become an important part of Cabaret Voltaire’s activities over the last few years,” the band said in a statement. “It is therefore appropriate that a document of this performance should be made available…”

The album was recorded at their 2011 reunion gig at London’s Roundhouse and was previously available as a limited edition CD from their website.

“The immense popularity of the medium of television has encouraged many people to become showmen, but this has not always resulted in a more intelligent use of the medium. Despite all its faults, however, there is no denying that television is one of the most powerful cultural forces of our time, and if we are to take full advantage of it, industrial societies must learn to develop the art of using images as an effective means of communication.”

“Industrial societies must learn to develop the art of using images as an effective means of communication.”

This quote from Marshall McLuhan’s Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man was written over forty years ago, but remains highly relevant today. In fact, it could be argued that his statement has become even more true than he could have imagined at the time.

In this blog I will discuss the history and development of industrial music from its beginnings in the late sixties through today.


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