What is Industrial Electronic Music?


Although there is no exact definition of Industrial Electronic Music, it is a term often used to describe a genre of music that originated in the mid-1970s. Industrial Electronic Music is a subgenre of Industrial and can be defined as dark, edgy, and occasionally experimental music. The music is typically produced with machines and synthesizers, but sometimes includes acoustic parts such as percussion or vocals.

The term often also refers to a specific style of music that combines influences from industrial music, heavy metal, and/or rock with electronic music. Although the term was originally used to describe only one subgenre of Industrial, it has since expanded to include several other related subgenres.

Industrial Electronic Music was first created by musicians experimenting with electronic instruments in the 1970s. Artists such as Throbbing Gristle, Cabaret Voltaire and Psychic TV were among the first bands to use electronic instruments and synthesizers in their songs. They were also among the first bands to use samples of found sounds in their songs.

Today there are many different types of industrial electronic music, including industrial rock (which combines elements of both industrial and rock), ambient techno (which combines elements of industrial techno and ambient music) and noise pop (which combines elements of industrial noise).

Industrial Electronic Music is a genre of music that combines harsh industrial sounds with electronic beats and samples. This genre is commonly associated with industrial metal. Industrial music has been around since the early 80’s and was created mostly by British bands such as Throbbing Gristle, Cabaret Voltaire, Test Dept and SPK. Industrial music is heavily influenced by the writings of William S. Burroughs and the teachings of J.G. Ballard.

The genre is defined by its heavy use of samples from movies, television shows, news reports, stock footage and commercials. These samples are usually processed to be very distorted or just sound “wrong” in some way. These samples are then mixed with electronic beats and industrial sounds such as chainsaws and industrial machinery to create a very unique sound that has an almost “futuristic” feel to it. In some cases these songs will also feature vocals that can range from screams to spoken-word to melodies, though most of the time they are heavily processed using distortion and other effects to make them sound unnatural or robotic in some way.

The genre was first created in Britain by groups like Throbbing Gristle, Cabaret Voltaire and Test Dept who were influenced by German bands like Kraftwerk, Tanger

Industrial electronic music is a style of experimental electronic music that draws on transgressive and provocative themes. The term was coined in the mid-1970s with the founding of Industrial Records by Genesis P-Orridge of Throbbing Gristle and Monte Cazazza.

While industrial music draws on a broad range of sources, including experimental composers such as John Cage, musique concrète and European electronic music (particularly the work of Karlheinz Stockhausen), industrial electronics were originally used to create sound effects for industrial locations, as well as incorporating extensive tape editing and musique concrète elements. In the late 1970s, artists began experimenting with synthesizers and sequencers in ways that would eventually be described as industrial.

Early post-punk groups such as Throbbing Gristle, Cabaret Voltaire, SPK, Test Dept, Einstürzende Neubauten, Clock DVA and Portion Control explored these ideas through music generated from industrial machinery and equipment. This material was generally released on cassette tape and LP record in small runs so that distribution could be easily accomplished by mail order directly from the artists themselves.

Groups like Laibach established connections between industrial electronics and neo-classical

Industrial music is a style of experimental music that draws on extreme noise and the destruction or transformation of instruments and equipment. The term was coined in the mid-1970s with the founding of Industrial Records by Genesis P-Orridge of Throbbing Gristle and Monte Cazazza. While the genre name originated with Throbbing Gristle’s emergence in the United Kingdom, concentrations of artists and labels vital to the genre also emerged in America, namely in Chicago.

Industrial electronic music is a blend of electronic sounds, sounds produced by mechanical machines or digital machine sounds. The term was coined in the 1970s by members of Throbbing Gristle. It was used to describe their music, which combined elements of industrial culture and music with tape music techniques, synthesizers and early sampling.

Industrial music is a genre of music that draws on harsh, transgressive or provocative sounds and themes. AllMusic defines industrial music as the “most abrasive and aggressive fusion of rock and electronic music” that was “initially a blend of avant-garde electronics experiments (tape music, musique concrète, white noise, synthesizers, sequencers, etc.) and punk provocation”.

Industrial music was created originally by using mechanical and electric machinery, and later advanced synthesizers, samplers and electronic percussion as the technology developed. Today much of industrial music’s sound is largely based on electronic instruments and plug-ins such as Ableton Live or Cubase or digital audio workstations. The definition had its heyday in the second half of the 1980s with artists such as Skinny Puppy, Ministry and Front Line Assembly but has since been expanded to describe everything from ambient noise to dancefloor oriented electropop.

Industrial music is a genre of experimental music which draws on harsh, transgressive or provocative sounds and themes. AllMusic defines industrial as the “most abrasive and aggressive fusion of rock and electronic music” that was “initially a blend of avant-garde electronics experiments (tape music, musique concrète, white noise, synthesizers, sequencers, etc.) and punk provocation”. Other artists have been cited as influences such as Kraftwerk and Gary Numan and Tubeway Army as well as Einstürzende Neubauten.

Industrial music drew from a broad range of predecessors. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the genre was first named in 1942 when The Musical Quarterly called Dmitri Shostakovich’s 1927 Symphony No. 2 “the high tide of ‘industrial music’.” Later, in 1972 The New York Times described works by Ferde Grofé as an “industrial symphony”.

Industrial music was created originally by using mechanical and electric machinery, and later advanced synthesizers, samplers and electronic percussion as the technology developed.

Industrial music is a genre of music that draws on transgressive and provocative themes. The term was coined in the mid-1970s with the founding of Industrial Records by members of Throbbing Gristle and Monte Cazazza. While the genre name originated with Throbbing Gristle’s emergence in the United Kingdom, concentrations of artists and labels vital to the genre also emerged in America and Europe.

What distinguishes industrial music from other forms of avant-garde music is that it does not attempt to express feelings subjectively but instead aspires to create an objective worldview—one where feelings have no place. The term was later adopted by American industrial musicians, especially those working in Chicago, though some regard this latter usage as an example of false advertising, since they were never affiliated with Throbbing Gristle’s Industrial Records.

The first industrial artists experimented with noise and aesthetically controversial topics, musically and visually, such as fascism, serial killers and the occult. Their production was not limited to music, but included mail art, performance art, installation pieces and other art forms. Prominent industrial musicians include Throbbing Gristle, Monte Cazazza, SPK, Boyd Rice, Cabaret Voltaire, Z’EV


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