The History Of 90’s Electronic Dance Music


The History Of 90’s Electronic Dance Music: a blog about the electronic music scene during the 90s.

The History Of 90’s Electronic Dance Music: a blog about the electronic music scene during the 90s.

The History Of 90’s Electronic Dance Music: a blog about the electronic music scene during the 90s.

The History Of 90’s Electronic Dance Music: a blog about the electronic music scene during the 90s.

The History Of 90’s Electronic Dance Music: a blog about the electronic music scene during the 90s.

The History Of 90’s Electronic Dance Music: a blog about the electronic music scene during the 90s.

The History Of 90’s Electronic Dance Music: a blog about the electronic music scene during the 90s.

The History Of 90’s Electronic Dance Music: a blog about the electronic music scene during the 90s.

The History Of 90’s Electronic Dance Music: a blog about the electronic music scene during the 90s. The idea for this website came about after listening to the Orbital Essential Mix from 1994 on the BBC website. They played a lot of great tracks that I hadn’t heard of & I thought it’d be cool to find out more about them. So, I started searching around on various websites and forums for information. But, although I found some interesting stuff, there wasn’t really a lot of information available online dedicated solely to this era. So, I decided to create my own website in order to provide a resource for people interested in learning more about this fascinating period in dance music history.

The History Of 90’s Electronic Dance Music is a blog about the electronic music scene during the 90s.

The early 90s saw a revolution in dance music, as the “rave” scene exploded from a small cult following to mainstream recognition. The sound of the rave revolution was House and Techno, with its pounding bass beats, synthesizer melodies and often sparse lyrics. For many people this was their first taste of electronic dance music.

In 1991, the UK rave scene changed radically with the Criminal Justice Act making raves illegal and unlicensed outdoor parties impossible. By 1993, hardcore began to change into jungle, with a new emphasis on breakbeats rather than 8-bar loops. Jungle was also known as Drum & Bass or simply “D&B”.

House & techno continued to evolve in the mid-90s, with more complex beats and greater emphasis on melody and vocals. Deep house & garage became increasingly popular in London clubs such as Ministry of Sound, while trance began to emerge in Germany. Happy Hardcore had become popular in Europe by 1995, especially in Holland and Belgium where it spawned an entire subculture of “happy ravers”.

By 1996, drum & bass had changed radically again with more experimental sounds emerging from artists like Source Direct & Photek

The creation of new electronic dance music genres and styles has been made possible by the emergence of new technologies such as sound synthesis, sampling, sequencers and digital audio workstations in the late 20th century. The rise of electronic dance music was also influenced by many other musical genres such as Chicago house, techno music, acid house, electro music and hip hop.

The History Of 90’s Electronic Dance Music is a blog about the history of electronic dance music as it evolved during the 90’s. It includes a comprehensive database with detailed information about artists, labels and releases from that era.

The 90s Electronic Dance Music Scene was the most exciting time for underground dance music in the history of mankind. It’s not just my opinion. The people who were there felt it too, and have been waiting for a time to come when they can tell their stories.

And now, after half a lifetime of waiting, that time has come.

It began with House Music and Techno, moved on to Jungle and Drum & Bass, went through Hardcore, Happy Hardcore and Trip Hop, up to Ambient Dub and Chillout music. But it wasn’t just about these styles of music – it was about culture and attitude. A whole generation of clubbers had learnt to love and respect each other for the first time, whatever their background or skin colour or social class. They loved to dance all night long to electronic beats in dark warehouses with minimal light show and no frills at all. This is their story: the story of what happened to them when they became adults, got jobs and bought houses – but never forgot where they came from.

The purpose of this blog is not only to tell these stories but also spread awareness about the incredible power that lies within all human beings if they can only find a way to tap into it together as one united force.”

Electronic dance music (EDM), also known as dance music, club music, or simply dance, is a broad range of percussive electronic music genres made largely for nightclubs, raves and festivals. EDM is generally produced for playback by disc jockeys (DJs) who create seamless selections of tracks, called a mix by segueing from one recording to another. EDM producers also perform their music live in a concert or festival setting in what is sometimes called a live PA. In Europe, EDM is more commonly called ‘dance music’, or simply ‘dance’.


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